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MEET:

Paul Skinner

A barrister “with excellent judgement”, who “thinks outside the box and is fearless in his imagination”, as well as “good at getting to grips with technical points and all round a great team player.”

(Legal 500)
Called: 2010

Paul specialises in the fields of public and human rights law, equality and discrimination law, employment law and commercial law.

Paul is regularly instructed in high-profile and complex cases, including a number featuring in The Lawyer’s annual list of Top 20 Cases. He regularly appears unled in the Court of Appeal and High Court and also has a busy practice as a senior junior as part of larger counsel teams.

Paul is a member of the Attorney General’s B panel of counsel.

Paul frequently acts for individuals, NGOs and public authorities in judicial reviews and statutory appeals against the state. Paul is ranked in the legal directories as a leading junior in both administrative and public law and immigration law.

He has particular expertise in:

Some of recent work include:

  • FL v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2024] UKUT 6 (AAC): Inappropriate to disapply unlawfully discriminatory provisions of regulations governing ‘migration’ from legacy benefits to Universal Credit because ‘inapt’.
  • R (Dragoi) v Secretary of State for Justice [2024] EWHC 60 (Admin): The decision to refuse to allow a foreign national offender to be removed from prison under the Early Release Scheme was lawful, given that he would be removed to the village in which his victims of human trafficking were located.
  • Abdi v Entry Clearance Officer [2023] EWCA Civ 1455: It was procedurally unfair to find that the appellants’ sponsor was not the source of the funds he was sending to the appellants (and that they were therefore not dependent on him for the purposes of their EEA Family Permit applications) without putting this to him in the appeal hearing.
  • ASO (Iraq) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2023] EWCA Civ 1282: Court of Appeal gave guidance on the assessment of materiality for the purposes of immigration appeals.
  • R (Keira Bell) v Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust [2022] 1 All ER 416 (CA): Inappropriate for High Court to have made a declaration as to when a gender-dysphoric child should make an application to the court should be made for a best interests decision as to whether they should be prescribed puberty blockers and to give general guidance in relation to when such children can consent to such treatment.
  • R (Lord) v Secretary of State for Health and Social Care [2022] EWHC 2004 (Admin): Judicial review of the pandemic-related requirement to only serve alcohol with a table meal.
  • Department for Transport v Information Commissioner [2022] 1 WLR 3403 (UTAAC): The Upper Tribunal gave guidance on (1) when aggregated data can be ‘personal data’ and (2) the proper approach to civil servant’s evidence of the chilling effect that the release of information would have under the Freedom of Information Act.
  • PF v Disclosure and Barring Service [2020] UKUT 256 (AAC): Test case on the scope of the Tribunal’s jurisdiction in error of fact cases.
  • R (Vincent) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2020] EWHC 1976 (Admin): The conversion of Support for Mortgage Interest from a benefit was not unlawfully discriminatory against disabled people.
  • ED (claiming as “AA”) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2020] UKUT 352 (AAC): Secretary of State’s power to reclaim overpaid benefits extends to the case of someone who has acquired their right to benefit by pretending to be someone that does not in fact exist.
  • Demirtaş and others v Turkey (2019) 69 EHRR 27: Grand Chamber held that the removal of Turkish MPs’ Parliamentary immunity and their arrest and detention for politically motivated reasons was a breach of Article 10 ECHR.
  • R (Parkin) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2019] EWHC 2356 (Admin): Universal Credit minimum income floor for the self-employed did not unlawfully discriminate against women.
  • R (FDA) v Minister for the Cabinet Office [2018] EWHC 2746 (Admin): No failure to consult the civil service unions in setting the pay remit guidance.
  • R (Buxton) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2019] PTSR 502: Cap on Access to Work Scheme did not unlawfully discriminate against D/deaf claimants.
  • R (B) v Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education [2019] PTSR 769: High Court gave guidance on standard of review of decisions that a complaint to the OIA is not eligible.
  • R(Gina Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the EU [2018] AC 61(SC): Government’s proposed notification of the UK’s intention to leave the EU without statutory authority was unlawful.
  • R (MA (Pakistan)) v Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) [2016] 1 WLR 5093 (CA): Court of Appeal gave guidance on the appropriate approach to considering whether it is reasonable to expect a child to leave the UK under s.117B(6) of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002.
  • El-Dinnaoui v Westminster City Council [2013] HLR 23 (CA): Irrational to provide accommodation in high-rise building to homeless person with vertigo.

Paul’s public law practice in areas affecting business spans:

Examples of Paul’s recent work in these areas include:

  • R (Heathrow Airport) v HM Treasury [2021] EWCA Civ 783: Government’s decision to abolish tax- and VAT-free shopping by withdrawing the VAT Retail Export Scheme and an Extra-Statutory Concession did not result from an unfair consultation and did not breach WTO Rules.
  • Department for Transport v Information Commissioner [2022] 1 WLR 3403 (UTAAC): The Upper Tribunal gave guidance on (1) when aggregated data can be ‘personal data’ and (2) the proper approach to civil servant’s evidence of the chilling effect that the release of information would have under the Freedom of Information Act.
  • Churchill Gowns Ltd v Ede & Ravenscroft Ltd [2020] CAT 22 – Challenge in the Competition Appeal Tribunal to the Defendant’s arrangements with universities for the provision of academic dress to students at graduation ceremonies on grounds they restrict competition and constitute an abuse of dominant position.
  • FCA competition investigation into asset management firms.
  • Advice on judicial review on human rights and competition grounds to the introduction of new conditions by the Phone-paid Services Authority.
  • Advice on viresof Environment Agency to enter and damage commercial property under the Water Resources Act 1991.
  • EU Commission Investigation into the dumping of Vinyl Acetate.
  • Represented a ‘payday lender’ in respect of the FSA, Competition Commission and FCA’s respective investigations into the market for high-cost short-term credit.
  • Advice in relation to the viresof the Financial Services Compensation Scheme.
  • Advice to a University on the acquisition of various broadcasting licenses.

 

Paul has considerable experience of a wide variety of commercial litigation. As well as the full range of commercial contractual and tortious disputes (including conspiracy and other economic torts), Paul has particular expertise in banking, EU law related and multi-party commercial disputes including group actions, as well as conflicts of laws issues and directors’ duties and other commercial employment issues.

Paul is currently writing the practitioners’ text on Abuse of Process for Oxford University Press and is a contributor to the leading loose-leaf text on consumer credit, Goode, Consumer Credit: Law and Practice. He has published in the Journal of International Banking and Financial Law.

Paul has experience of obtaining freezing orders and other injunctions at short notice to recover, secure and trace at-risk assets and to unwind fraudulent transactions.

Recent and notable cases include:

  • Benyatov v Credit Suisse Securities (Europe) Ltd  [2023] 3 All ER 636: Investment bank not liable either in tort or under implied contractual indemnity for consequences of banker’s prosecution and conviction abroad.
  • Bravo v Amerisur Resources plc [2020] EWHC 203 (QB): Freezing order and group litigation order obtained in international mass tort claim for environmental damage in Columbia.
  • Advised Office of Rail and Road on the interpretation of the Network Code and the Timetable Planning Rules.
  • Acted in complex asset tracing claim, including to reverse gift of property to defraud creditors under section 423 of the Insolvency Act 1981, associated freezing order applications.
  • Advice on group claim for breach of contract by consumers against water industry in respect of non-compliance with obligations in respect of sewage treatment.
  • Burrell v Helical (Bramshott Place) Ltd [2017] ECC 3: High Court gave guidance on the meaning of “credit” in the Consumer Credit Act 1974 and whether exit fees in leases of properties in retirement villages were unfair terms.
  • The Bomu-Bonny Oil Pipeline Litigation (High Court, TCC): Part of the counsel team for the Defendant in this group litigation relating to oil spills in the Niger Delta, involving a variety of private international law issues.
  • The PIP Breast Implant Litigation (High Court, QB): Instructed to defend contractual claims against a clinic in respect of breast implants used which were of unsatisfactory quality.
  • Waterland v Bank of Scotland plc (High Court, Chancery Division – sole counsel) Breach of contract claim for wrongful conversion of various secured lending facilities from Sterling into Swiss Francs (settled at mediation).
  • Injunctive proceedings in support of an arbitration relating to the breakdown of a dental practice partnership.
  • Interest Rate Hedging Products: Advice to a major retail bank in respect of a number of missold interest rate hedging products and in particular the extent of recoverable losses and applicable principles of causation.
  • Advice on claim for breach of copyright by song-writer in respect of well-known number 1 hit.

 

Paul has a significant practice in matters with a public and private international law element. He has undertaken a number of cases before the European Court of Human Rights and his domestic cases frequently involve questions of jurisdiction, choice of law and the interpretation of international law.

Recent and notable cases include:

  • Benyatov v Credit Suisse Securities (Europe) Ltd [2023] 3 All ER 636: Investment bank not liable either in tort or under implied contractual indemnity for consequences of banker’s prosecution and conviction abroad.
  • R (Heathrow Airport) v HM Treasury [2021] EWCA Civ 783: Government’s decision to abolish tax- and VAT-free shopping by withdrawing the VAT Retail Export Scheme and an Extra-Statutory Concession did not breach WTO Rules and was justiciable in the English courts.
  • Bravo v Amerisur Resources plc [2020] EWHC 203 (QB): Freezing order and group litigation order obtained in international mass tort claim for environmental damage in Columbia.
  • Demirtaş and others v Turkey (2019) 69 EHRR 27 (ECtHR Grand Chamber): Representing Article 19 and Human Rights Watch in their successful intervention in this important case relating to the removal of Turkish MPs’ Parliamentary immunity and their arrest and detention for politically motivated reasons.
  • Bodo Community v Shell Petroleum Development Co of Nigeria – Representing Shell in claim by 15,000 claimants in proceedings concerning extensive pollution in Rivers State, Nigeria.
  • Bytyqi v Republic of Serbia (ECtHR) – Advised the family of three American-Kosovan Albanians killed by Serbian police in proposed claim to the European Court of Human Rights for breach of the investigative duty under Article 2 ECHR.

Paul is ranked as a leading employment law junior by Legal 500 and practices across the full range of employment law matters in both the High Court and Tribunal. He has particular expertise in the contractual and tortious duties employers owe employees posted abroad. Paul is also regularly instructed in public law discrimination challenges and trade union disputes and frequently advises public sector pension schemes in relation to discrimination, forfeiture and interpretation issues.

Recent and notable cases include:

  • Benyatov v Credit Suisse Securities (Europe) Ltd [2023] 3 All ER 636 (CA): Leading case on when an employer may be liable in contract and tort for career losses suffered by an employee convicted abroad by reason of his work. Investment bank not liable either in tort or under implied contractual indemnity for consequences of banker’s prosecution and conviction in Romania.
  • Ebury Partners UK Ltd v Acton Davis [2023] IRLR 486 (EAT): ET had been wrong to reconsider its earlier dismissal of constructive unfair dismissal claim on a basis that did not form part of the reconsideration application.
  • Hopkins v Secretary of State for Justice (ET): Successfully defended high-profile whistleblowing claim by analyst whose research indicated that the Sex Offender Treatment Programme in prisons may increase the likelihood of reoffending.
  • R (Vincent) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2020] EWHC 1976 (Admin): The conversion of Support for Mortgage Interest from a benefit was not unlawfully discriminatory against disabled people.
  • R (Parkin) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2019] EWHC 2356 (Admin): Universal Credit minimum income floor for the self-employed did not unlawfully discriminate against women.
  • R (FDA) v Minister for the Cabinet Office [2018] EWHC 2746 (Admin): No failure to consult the civil service unions in setting the pay remit guidance.

 

Paul had a first career as a professional musician. He holds a first class music degree and licentiate diploma from the Royal Academy of Music, London, and was Woodwind finalist in BBC Young Musician of the Year.

Paul subsequently studied for an accelerated 2-year law degree at Cambridge and undertook the Bar Vocational Course at BPP Law School.

In 2011/12, Paul spent a year as Judicial Assistant to Lord Dyson and Lord Walker at the UK Supreme Court. Prior to this he worked at the European Court of Human Rights.

Paul was a lecturer in law at the Open University from 2010-2012.

Paul is currently writing a book on Abuse of Process and has written a number of articles in peer reviewed journals, including the Law Quarterly Review, the Journal of International Banking and Financial Law and the European Human Rights Law Review.

Paul sits as a Deputy Judge of the Upper Tribunal and is a member of the Attorney General’s B Panel of Counsel.

Paul is regulated by the Bar Standards Board and accepts instructions under Standard Contractual Terms. To find out more information on this and the way we work at Matrix, including our fee transparency statement, please see our see our service standards

DIRECTORY RECOMMENDATIONS

"Paul is a clear and persuasive advocate who recognises and focusses on his best points."

Legal 500, 2024, Administrative Law and Human Rights

"Paul is an excellent lawyer with a great perspective on the way that different areas of law interact. A very broad knowledge spanning all areas of public law."

Legal 500, 2023, Administrative & Human Rights

"Easy to work with - he was collaborative and approachable. He also has creative flashes, thinking of innovative and good points to make in argument."

Legal 500, 2023, Employment

"He is a very good lawyer, good at getting to grips with technical points and all round a great team player."

Legal 500, Administrative and Public Law

"He is empathetic and attuned to his client’s needs."

Legal 500, Immigration (including business immigration)

"Has creative ideas, thinks outside the box and is fearless in his imagination."

Legal 500, Employment

"A careful and thoughtful barrister, who eases the most emotional and vulnerable clients."

Legal 500, Property Litigation
Matrix Chambers
24 HOUR ASSISTANCE
+44 (0)20 7404 3447
Called: 2010

A barrister “with excellent judgement”, who “thinks outside the box and is fearless in his imagination”, as well as “good at getting to grips with technical points and all round a great team player.”

(Legal 500)

MAIN AREAS OF PRACTICE

  • International Arbitration
  • Commercial Law
  • Mediation
  • Competition
  • Employment Law
  • Environmental Law and Natural Resources
  • EU Law
  • Civil Liberties and Human Rights
  • Immigration, Asylum and Free Movement
  • Local Government Law
  • Media and Information Law
  • Data Protection
  • Public International Law
  • Public Law
  • Sports Law
  • Police, Inquests and Prison
  • Commercial Public Law
  • Private International Law
  • Equality and Discrimination Law
  • Competition and EU

Paul Skinner

Contact Paul: paulskinner@matrixlaw.co.uk | +44 (0)20 7404 3447

Contact Paul's Practice Team (Team X): TeamX@matrixlaw.co.uk


Paul specialises in the fields of public and human rights law, equality and discrimination law, employment law and commercial law.

Paul is regularly instructed in high-profile and complex cases, including a number featuring in The Lawyer’s annual list of Top 20 Cases. He regularly appears unled in the Court of Appeal and High Court and also has a busy practice as a senior junior as part of larger counsel teams.

Paul is a member of the Attorney General’s B panel of counsel.

Human Rights and Public Law Involving Individuals

Paul frequently acts for individuals, NGOs and public authorities in judicial reviews and statutory appeals against the state. Paul is ranked in the legal directories as a leading junior in both administrative and public law and immigration law.

He has particular expertise in:

Some of recent work include:

  • FL v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2024] UKUT 6 (AAC): Inappropriate to disapply unlawfully discriminatory provisions of regulations governing ‘migration’ from legacy benefits to Universal Credit because ‘inapt’.
  • R (Dragoi) v Secretary of State for Justice [2024] EWHC 60 (Admin): The decision to refuse to allow a foreign national offender to be removed from prison under the Early Release Scheme was lawful, given that he would be removed to the village in which his victims of human trafficking were located.
  • Abdi v Entry Clearance Officer [2023] EWCA Civ 1455: It was procedurally unfair to find that the appellants’ sponsor was not the source of the funds he was sending to the appellants (and that they were therefore not dependent on him for the purposes of their EEA Family Permit applications) without putting this to him in the appeal hearing.
  • ASO (Iraq) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2023] EWCA Civ 1282: Court of Appeal gave guidance on the assessment of materiality for the purposes of immigration appeals.
  • R (Keira Bell) v Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust [2022] 1 All ER 416 (CA): Inappropriate for High Court to have made a declaration as to when a gender-dysphoric child should make an application to the court should be made for a best interests decision as to whether they should be prescribed puberty blockers and to give general guidance in relation to when such children can consent to such treatment.
  • R (Lord) v Secretary of State for Health and Social Care [2022] EWHC 2004 (Admin): Judicial review of the pandemic-related requirement to only serve alcohol with a table meal.
  • Department for Transport v Information Commissioner [2022] 1 WLR 3403 (UTAAC): The Upper Tribunal gave guidance on (1) when aggregated data can be ‘personal data’ and (2) the proper approach to civil servant’s evidence of the chilling effect that the release of information would have under the Freedom of Information Act.
  • PF v Disclosure and Barring Service [2020] UKUT 256 (AAC): Test case on the scope of the Tribunal’s jurisdiction in error of fact cases.
  • R (Vincent) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2020] EWHC 1976 (Admin): The conversion of Support for Mortgage Interest from a benefit was not unlawfully discriminatory against disabled people.
  • ED (claiming as “AA”) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2020] UKUT 352 (AAC): Secretary of State’s power to reclaim overpaid benefits extends to the case of someone who has acquired their right to benefit by pretending to be someone that does not in fact exist.
  • Demirtaş and others v Turkey (2019) 69 EHRR 27: Grand Chamber held that the removal of Turkish MPs’ Parliamentary immunity and their arrest and detention for politically motivated reasons was a breach of Article 10 ECHR.
  • R (Parkin) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2019] EWHC 2356 (Admin): Universal Credit minimum income floor for the self-employed did not unlawfully discriminate against women.
  • R (FDA) v Minister for the Cabinet Office [2018] EWHC 2746 (Admin): No failure to consult the civil service unions in setting the pay remit guidance.
  • R (Buxton) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2019] PTSR 502: Cap on Access to Work Scheme did not unlawfully discriminate against D/deaf claimants.
  • R (B) v Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education [2019] PTSR 769: High Court gave guidance on standard of review of decisions that a complaint to the OIA is not eligible.
  • R(Gina Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the EU [2018] AC 61(SC): Government’s proposed notification of the UK’s intention to leave the EU without statutory authority was unlawful.
  • R (MA (Pakistan)) v Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) [2016] 1 WLR 5093 (CA): Court of Appeal gave guidance on the appropriate approach to considering whether it is reasonable to expect a child to leave the UK under s.117B(6) of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002.
  • El-Dinnaoui v Westminster City Council [2013] HLR 23 (CA): Irrational to provide accommodation in high-rise building to homeless person with vertigo.

Commercial Public Law

Paul’s public law practice in areas affecting business spans:

Examples of Paul’s recent work in these areas include:

  • R (Heathrow Airport) v HM Treasury [2021] EWCA Civ 783: Government’s decision to abolish tax- and VAT-free shopping by withdrawing the VAT Retail Export Scheme and an Extra-Statutory Concession did not result from an unfair consultation and did not breach WTO Rules.
  • Department for Transport v Information Commissioner [2022] 1 WLR 3403 (UTAAC): The Upper Tribunal gave guidance on (1) when aggregated data can be ‘personal data’ and (2) the proper approach to civil servant’s evidence of the chilling effect that the release of information would have under the Freedom of Information Act.
  • Churchill Gowns Ltd v Ede & Ravenscroft Ltd [2020] CAT 22 – Challenge in the Competition Appeal Tribunal to the Defendant’s arrangements with universities for the provision of academic dress to students at graduation ceremonies on grounds they restrict competition and constitute an abuse of dominant position.
  • FCA competition investigation into asset management firms.
  • Advice on judicial review on human rights and competition grounds to the introduction of new conditions by the Phone-paid Services Authority.
  • Advice on viresof Environment Agency to enter and damage commercial property under the Water Resources Act 1991.
  • EU Commission Investigation into the dumping of Vinyl Acetate.
  • Represented a ‘payday lender’ in respect of the FSA, Competition Commission and FCA’s respective investigations into the market for high-cost short-term credit.
  • Advice in relation to the viresof the Financial Services Compensation Scheme.
  • Advice to a University on the acquisition of various broadcasting licenses.

 

Commercial Litigation

Paul has considerable experience of a wide variety of commercial litigation. As well as the full range of commercial contractual and tortious disputes (including conspiracy and other economic torts), Paul has particular expertise in banking, EU law related and multi-party commercial disputes including group actions, as well as conflicts of laws issues and directors’ duties and other commercial employment issues.

Paul is currently writing the practitioners’ text on Abuse of Process for Oxford University Press and is a contributor to the leading loose-leaf text on consumer credit, Goode, Consumer Credit: Law and Practice. He has published in the Journal of International Banking and Financial Law.

Paul has experience of obtaining freezing orders and other injunctions at short notice to recover, secure and trace at-risk assets and to unwind fraudulent transactions.

Recent and notable cases include:

  • Benyatov v Credit Suisse Securities (Europe) Ltd  [2023] 3 All ER 636: Investment bank not liable either in tort or under implied contractual indemnity for consequences of banker’s prosecution and conviction abroad.
  • Bravo v Amerisur Resources plc [2020] EWHC 203 (QB): Freezing order and group litigation order obtained in international mass tort claim for environmental damage in Columbia.
  • Advised Office of Rail and Road on the interpretation of the Network Code and the Timetable Planning Rules.
  • Acted in complex asset tracing claim, including to reverse gift of property to defraud creditors under section 423 of the Insolvency Act 1981, associated freezing order applications.
  • Advice on group claim for breach of contract by consumers against water industry in respect of non-compliance with obligations in respect of sewage treatment.
  • Burrell v Helical (Bramshott Place) Ltd [2017] ECC 3: High Court gave guidance on the meaning of “credit” in the Consumer Credit Act 1974 and whether exit fees in leases of properties in retirement villages were unfair terms.
  • The Bomu-Bonny Oil Pipeline Litigation (High Court, TCC): Part of the counsel team for the Defendant in this group litigation relating to oil spills in the Niger Delta, involving a variety of private international law issues.
  • The PIP Breast Implant Litigation (High Court, QB): Instructed to defend contractual claims against a clinic in respect of breast implants used which were of unsatisfactory quality.
  • Waterland v Bank of Scotland plc (High Court, Chancery Division – sole counsel) Breach of contract claim for wrongful conversion of various secured lending facilities from Sterling into Swiss Francs (settled at mediation).
  • Injunctive proceedings in support of an arbitration relating to the breakdown of a dental practice partnership.
  • Interest Rate Hedging Products: Advice to a major retail bank in respect of a number of missold interest rate hedging products and in particular the extent of recoverable losses and applicable principles of causation.
  • Advice on claim for breach of copyright by song-writer in respect of well-known number 1 hit.

 

International Law

Paul has a significant practice in matters with a public and private international law element. He has undertaken a number of cases before the European Court of Human Rights and his domestic cases frequently involve questions of jurisdiction, choice of law and the interpretation of international law.

Recent and notable cases include:

  • Benyatov v Credit Suisse Securities (Europe) Ltd [2023] 3 All ER 636: Investment bank not liable either in tort or under implied contractual indemnity for consequences of banker’s prosecution and conviction abroad.
  • R (Heathrow Airport) v HM Treasury [2021] EWCA Civ 783: Government’s decision to abolish tax- and VAT-free shopping by withdrawing the VAT Retail Export Scheme and an Extra-Statutory Concession did not breach WTO Rules and was justiciable in the English courts.
  • Bravo v Amerisur Resources plc [2020] EWHC 203 (QB): Freezing order and group litigation order obtained in international mass tort claim for environmental damage in Columbia.
  • Demirtaş and others v Turkey (2019) 69 EHRR 27 (ECtHR Grand Chamber): Representing Article 19 and Human Rights Watch in their successful intervention in this important case relating to the removal of Turkish MPs’ Parliamentary immunity and their arrest and detention for politically motivated reasons.
  • Bodo Community v Shell Petroleum Development Co of Nigeria – Representing Shell in claim by 15,000 claimants in proceedings concerning extensive pollution in Rivers State, Nigeria.
  • Bytyqi v Republic of Serbia (ECtHR) – Advised the family of three American-Kosovan Albanians killed by Serbian police in proposed claim to the European Court of Human Rights for breach of the investigative duty under Article 2 ECHR.

Employment and Discrimination

Paul is ranked as a leading employment law junior by Legal 500 and practices across the full range of employment law matters in both the High Court and Tribunal. He has particular expertise in the contractual and tortious duties employers owe employees posted abroad. Paul is also regularly instructed in public law discrimination challenges and trade union disputes and frequently advises public sector pension schemes in relation to discrimination, forfeiture and interpretation issues.

Recent and notable cases include:

  • Benyatov v Credit Suisse Securities (Europe) Ltd [2023] 3 All ER 636 (CA): Leading case on when an employer may be liable in contract and tort for career losses suffered by an employee convicted abroad by reason of his work. Investment bank not liable either in tort or under implied contractual indemnity for consequences of banker’s prosecution and conviction in Romania.
  • Ebury Partners UK Ltd v Acton Davis [2023] IRLR 486 (EAT): ET had been wrong to reconsider its earlier dismissal of constructive unfair dismissal claim on a basis that did not form part of the reconsideration application.
  • Hopkins v Secretary of State for Justice (ET): Successfully defended high-profile whistleblowing claim by analyst whose research indicated that the Sex Offender Treatment Programme in prisons may increase the likelihood of reoffending.
  • R (Vincent) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2020] EWHC 1976 (Admin): The conversion of Support for Mortgage Interest from a benefit was not unlawfully discriminatory against disabled people.
  • R (Parkin) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2019] EWHC 2356 (Admin): Universal Credit minimum income floor for the self-employed did not unlawfully discriminate against women.
  • R (FDA) v Minister for the Cabinet Office [2018] EWHC 2746 (Admin): No failure to consult the civil service unions in setting the pay remit guidance.

 

Education and other experience

Paul had a first career as a professional musician. He holds a first class music degree and licentiate diploma from the Royal Academy of Music, London, and was Woodwind finalist in BBC Young Musician of the Year.

Paul subsequently studied for an accelerated 2-year law degree at Cambridge and undertook the Bar Vocational Course at BPP Law School.

In 2011/12, Paul spent a year as Judicial Assistant to Lord Dyson and Lord Walker at the UK Supreme Court. Prior to this he worked at the European Court of Human Rights.

Paul was a lecturer in law at the Open University from 2010-2012.

Paul is currently writing a book on Abuse of Process and has written a number of articles in peer reviewed journals, including the Law Quarterly Review, the Journal of International Banking and Financial Law and the European Human Rights Law Review.

Paul sits as a Deputy Judge of the Upper Tribunal and is a member of the Attorney General’s B Panel of Counsel.

DIRECTORY RECOMMENDATIONS

"Paul is a clear and persuasive advocate who recognises and focusses on his best points."

Legal 500, 2024, Administrative Law and Human Rights

"Paul is an excellent lawyer with a great perspective on the way that different areas of law interact. A very broad knowledge spanning all areas of public law."

Legal 500, 2023, Administrative & Human Rights

"Easy to work with - he was collaborative and approachable. He also has creative flashes, thinking of innovative and good points to make in argument."

Legal 500, 2023, Employment

"He is a very good lawyer, good at getting to grips with technical points and all round a great team player."

Legal 500, Administrative and Public Law

"He is empathetic and attuned to his client’s needs."

Legal 500, Immigration (including business immigration)

"Has creative ideas, thinks outside the box and is fearless in his imagination."

Legal 500, Employment

"A careful and thoughtful barrister, who eases the most emotional and vulnerable clients."

Legal 500, Property Litigation