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International

Matrix Chambers is a group of independent and specialist barristers, academics and foreign lawyers who work across a wide range of areas of law. With offices in London, Geneva and Brussels, our members have extensive experience internationally having worked in over 100 countries across 19 different practice areas. Owing to Matrix’s multi-disciplinary practice and standard of excellence, we are uniquely positioned to deal with complex legal issues, particularly where they overlap multiple areas of law.

Our clients

Our clients include multinational corporations, law firms, banks, directors, regulators, professional bodies, foreign Governments, newspapers and media outlets, in the UK and internationally.

Our services

  • Matrix members are experts in their field and their services include:
  • Advising on legal strategy to guide your actions in legal disputes.
  • Legal advice on the issues in your case, or advice as to the strength of your case as a whole.
  • Representing you in a dispute resolution forum, whether in an arbitration (either acting for you
    or acting as an arbitrator), a tribunal, a mediation or in court.
  • Carrying out investigations, inquiries and audits of company policies, particularly in regard to
    corporate social responsibility and checking compliance with human rights obligations.

What is the difference between a solicitor and a barrister?

In the UK the legal profession is split into barristers and solicitors. Whilst there are many other services that they can provide, barristers are known for appearing in court. They are independent practitioners who are self-employed and provide their services personally. Barristers work in offices, known as chambers, in order to share support staff and facilities.

Barristers cannot generally be instructed by members of the public unless they are public access trained. Usually you would go to a solicitor about your case and then the solicitor will instruct a barrister when it is appropriate. For more information about instructing a barrister as a member of the public, please see here.

newsInternational

Prof Christian Tams speaking at Paris’ first virtual arbitration week

Professor Christian Tams will be speaking at Paris Arbitration Week as part of a panel brought together by Eversheds Sutherland on the topic of ‘Finding the State: Foreign Investment and Disputed Territories, State Succession and Military Conflicts’. Speaking alongside Professor Nicolas Angelet and Professor Alina Miron, the panel will be looking at the way in […]

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